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Loveland man recovered from COVID-19 believes plasma can help, encourages donations – WLWT Cincinnati

A Loveland man being treated for cancer found himself in the hospital for 38 days with COVID-19.At one point, he was on a ventilator.He is now pushing for people to donate specialized plasma he believes helped him get better.Ron Sikkema said he was given COVID-19 convalescent plasma while in the hospital.He doesn’t know for sure that it was the key to his recovery, but he feels like it made a big difference.”The cough, the fevers, I did about 10 days of that,” Sikkema said.He said showing those symptoms in the midst of a battle with lymphoma prompted his wife to take him to UC West Chester Hospital on March 28.Sikkema said his oxygen levels were plummeting and doctors found he had COVID-19.”My lungs just basically almost failed and then I went into the ventilator for a period of time,” Sikkema said.He remembers a fraction of his 38 days in the hospital, including moments like his 55th birthday in his room.His friends, family and Procter & Gamble coworkers celebrated from outside.”I said to my wife, it was the best birthday I’ve had in 55 years, because even though I was in isolation I’ve never felt more loved,” Sikkema said.He said he was given COVID-19 convalescent plasma on May 1, in an attempt to boost his immune system.”I think it is part of getting on the road to recovery quicker and they will learn, I think they’ll figure it out whether what’s the right time to do it,” he said.He was discharged on May 4.Doctors with the Hoxworth Blood Center said dozens of CCP units have been distributed in three weeks.”Anecdotally, I think there’s a lot of optimism that this is actually making a difference for the patients who are receiving it,” Dr. David Oh said.While Sikkema isn’t sure what CCP can do, he got to go home and hopes people keep donating so others may be able to as well.”I feel very, very good and I would tell you that I consider that part of the journey, and I’m glad I did it,” he said.Sikkema said three of his four sons and his wife have had the virus.The other son is separated, but they are all in quarantine.As far as his cancer treatments, he said doctors think things look good and it should be OK for him to hold off on starting them for a bit a longer.The Hoxworth Blood Center said it will try to continue collecting from current donors but officials are still looking for more donations from people who have recovered from COVID-19.There are guidelines you must meet and donations must be made by appointment.For more information on eligibility and how you can donate, go the Hoxworth Blood Center’s website.

LOVELAND, Ohio —

A Loveland man being treated for cancer found himself in the hospital for 38 days with COVID-19.

At one point, he was on a ventilator.

He is now pushing for people to donate specialized plasma he believes helped him get better.

Ron Sikkema said he was given COVID-19 convalescent plasma while in the hospital.

He doesn’t know for sure that it was the key to his recovery, but he feels like it made a big difference.

“The cough, the fevers, I did about 10 days of that,” Sikkema said.

He said showing those symptoms in the midst of a battle with lymphoma prompted his wife to take him to UC West Chester Hospital on March 28.

Sikkema said his oxygen levels were plummeting and doctors found he had COVID-19.

“My lungs just basically almost failed and then I went into the ventilator for a period of time,” Sikkema said.

He remembers a fraction of his 38 days in the hospital, including moments like his 55th birthday in his room.

His friends, family and Procter & Gamble coworkers celebrated from outside.

“I said to my wife, it was the best birthday I’ve had in 55 years, because even though I was in isolation I’ve never felt more loved,” Sikkema said.

He said he was given COVID-19 convalescent plasma on May 1, in an attempt to boost his immune system.

“I think it is part of getting on the road to recovery quicker and they will learn, I think they’ll figure it out whether what’s the right time to do it,” he said.

He was discharged on May 4.

Doctors with the Hoxworth Blood Center said dozens of CCP units have been distributed in three weeks.

“Anecdotally, I think there’s a lot of optimism that this is actually making a difference for the patients who are receiving it,” Dr. David Oh said.

While Sikkema isn’t sure what CCP can do, he got to go home and hopes people keep donating so others may be able to as well.

“I feel very, very good and I would tell you that I consider that part of the journey, and I’m glad I did it,” he said.

Sikkema said three of his four sons and his wife have had the virus.

The other son is separated, but they are all in quarantine.

As far as his cancer treatments, he said doctors think things look good and it should be OK for him to hold off on starting them for a bit a longer.

The Hoxworth Blood Center said it will try to continue collecting from current donors but officials are still looking for more donations from people who have recovered from COVID-19.

There are guidelines you must meet and donations must be made by appointment.

For more information on eligibility and how you can donate, go the Hoxworth Blood Center’s website.

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